Introduction to Corporate Liability - Section 17A, MACC Act 2009

Anti-Corruption
14 Lessons
02 Hours

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Course Description

Corporate liability refers to the legal responsibility of a corporation or business entity for its actions or inactions that result in harm or damage to individuals, society, or the environment. Corporate liability can arise from a wide range of activities, including but not limited to product defects, environmental pollution, securities fraud, discrimination, bribery, and other forms of corporate misconduct.

 

Under the principle of corporate liability, corporations can be held accountable for the actions of their employees, agents, and subsidiaries. This means that a corporation can be held liable for the wrongful conduct of its employees, even if the corporation did not directly participate in the misconduct.

 

Corporate liability can take various forms, including civil, criminal, and administrative liability. Civil liability involves a corporation being held accountable for damages caused to individuals or property, and may result in financial compensation being awarded to the victims. Criminal liability involves a corporation being held accountable for criminal offences committed by its employees or agents, which can result in fines, imprisonment, or other penalties. Administrative liability involves a corporation being held accountable for violations of regulatory laws, which can result in fines, sanctions, or other penalties.

 

The concept of corporate liability is important for ensuring that corporations operate in a responsible and ethical manner, and that they are held accountable for any harm or damage they cause. It also serves as a deterrent for corporate misconduct and can help promote corporate social responsibility.

 

What You Will Learn

  1. To learn about the basic concept of corporate liability.
  2. To learn about the offences committed by a commercial organisation under Section 17A MACC Act 2009.
  3. To understand the TRUST principle as a statutory defence for Commercial Organisations.

 

Course Lessons

The first lesson is a brief introduction on Section 17A and what are the common questions that the public asked about Section 17A.

To understand the context of Section 17A MACC Act 2009, it is important for learners to know what is a commercial organisation under Section 17A.

To understand  who are considered as  associated persons categorised under Section 17A MACC Act 2009.

In this session, we will go through the initiative under Section 17A. Why Section 17A MACC Act 2009 was introduced into the MACC Act 2009?

In this section, we will provide an overview of the difference in enforcement before and after the enactment of Section 17A MACC Act 2009.

Corruption has been widely explained with different definitions. Learners will be exposed to the fundamental types of corruption defined under the MACC Act 2009.

In this session, we will be covering the main factors contributing to acts of corruption. Learners can have a better understanding of the factors contributing to acts of corruption.

In the previous session, we covered the offences associated with individuals. As we dive into Section 17 of the MACC Act 2009, let's have a look at how corruption happens in a commercial organisation.

A case study of Section 17A will be illustrated in this section to enable learners to better understand Section 17A MACC Act 2009.

In this session, we will be covering what are the main factors contributing to offences by a corporation under Section 17A MACC Act 2009. Learners can have a better understanding of the factors contributing to an act of corruption.

Section 17A MACC Act 2009 does not only penalise the commercial organisation, but it also provides a statutory defence for the commercial organisation to defend itself against a charge under Section 17A. In this session, let's see how a commercial organisation can defend itself.

Adequate procedures are important to ensure that a commercial organisation is taking sufficient steps to keep its internal anti-corruption plan implemented in a good manner. TRUST Principle will act as a guide for commercial organisations to establish adequate procedures.

In this section, we will go through a case study on corporate liability to understand how corporate liability impacts an organisation and why adequate procedures are important.

Learners are required to go thru an assessment to evaluate their understanding of corporate liability under Section 17A, MACC Act 2009. Good luck!

Introduction to Corporate Liability - Section 17A, MACC Act 2009
RM 140.00
Jan 02, 2024 - Dec 31, 2024
1 Course
02 Hours 03 Minutes
This bundle includes :
Introduction to Corporate Liability - Section 17A, MACC Act 2009
14 Lessons
02 Hours